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Shakespeare in Culture

Shakespeare in Culture

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內容簡介

  Shakespeare, as well as the reading, translating, teaching, criticizing, performing, and adapting of Shakespeare, does not exist outside culture. Culture in its many varieties not only informs the Shakespearean corpus, productions, and scholarship, but is also reciprocally shaped by them. Culture never remains stable, but constantly evolves, travels, procreates, blends, and mutates; no less incessantly, the understanding and rewriting of Shakespeare fluctuates. The relations between Shakespeare and culture thus comprise a dynamic flux which calls for examination and reexamination. It is this rich and even labyrinthine network of meanings—intercultural, intertextual, and intergeneric—that this volume intends to explicate. The essays collected here, most of them first presented at the Fourth Conference of the National Taiwan University Shakespeare Forum held in Taipei in 2009, cover a wide range of topics—religion, philosophy, history, aesthetics, as well as politics—and thereby illustrate how fruitfully complex the topic of cultural interchange can be.

編者簡介

  Bi-qi Beatrice LEI 雷碧琦 is Associate Professor at the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures of National Taiwan University and has served as Coordinator of the NTU Shakespeare Forum www.Shakespeare.tw) since 2006. She received her PhD in English from New York University, and has published on Sidney, Shakespeare, intercultural theatre, television drama, and early modern edicine. She is currently working on a book project on and an electronic database of Shakespeare in Taiwan.

  CHING-HSI PERNG 彭鏡禧, Distinguished Professor Emeritus, National Taiwan University, is currently a Visiting Professor at Fu Jen Catholic University. A recipient of many honors for teaching, research, and literary translation, he has done research at Yale, Oxford, and University of Chicago, taught at University of Virginia as a Fulbright Visiting Scholar, and lectured widely in Taiwan and China. Among some thirty books to his credit are three studies on Shakespeare, plus the Chinese translations of Hamlet and The Merchant of Venice; the latter he adapted (with Chen Fang) into aYuju opera with performances in Taiwan, China, London, and the U.S.A. His latest work, an annotated translation of Measure for Measure, is forthcoming, which has also been adapted into a Yuju opera, to be premiered at Taipei’s National Theater in June 2012.

 

目錄

List of Figures
Notes on Contributors
Acknowledgements
Foreword --The Future Is Fusion DENNIS KENNEDY
Preview DAVID BEVINGTON
Introduction BI-QI BEATRICE LEI

Part One: Shakespeare's Response to His Culture
1. The Culture of Early Modern Protestantism: Predestination in Shakespearean Comedy and Tragedy
JASON GLECKMAN
2. Of Moors and Whores: Cultural Contrast in Othello
BARRY HALL
3. Honor and Maternity in Coriolanus
LIN CHI-I

Part Two: Reading in Shakespeare and Reading of Shakespeare
4. “A voucher stronger than ever law could make”: Writing and Media Literacy in Cymbeline
TED MOTOHASHI
5. Shakespeare Reverbatin' : Spectral Media, Unread-ability, and the Weak Sovereignty of the In/Defi nitive Edition
RICHARD BURT

Part Three: Shakespeare in East Asia's Indigenous Theatres
6. Bonding Bangzi and the Bard: The Case of Yue/Shu (Bond) and The Merchant of Venice
CHING-HSI PERNG
7. Korean Shakespeare and the Endings of the Lear Story
HAN YOUNGLIM
8. Is No Shakespeare in Noh Shakespeare? Re-/Mis-Shaping Shakespeare on the Noh Stage
MINAMI RYUTA

Part Four: Asian Shakespeare in Historical Perspective
9. Shakespeare, (Southeast) Asia, and the Question of Origins
JUDY CELINE ICK
10. The First Japanese Adaptation of Othello (1903) and Japanese Colonialism
YOSHIHARA YUKARI
11. Paradox of Chinese Nationalism: Two Gentlemen of Verona in Silent Film
BI-QI BEATRICE LEI

Part Five: Shakespeare as Global Commodity
12. Hamlet and the Market in Cultural Commodities: Global and Local Revisited
ANN THOMPSON
13. Uses and Abuses of Shakespeare's Sonnets on Film and Television
MARIANGELA TEMPERA

Index

 

Preview
David BEVINGTON

  Shakespeare in Culture, having grown out of a conference at the National Taiwan University Shakespeare Forum in 2009, is devoted to the proposition that culture and Shakespeare alike are protean in their unceasing change, and are alike in such ways as to enable us to read “Shakespeare” as a kind of paradigm of that cultural change. Shakespeare is in culture in the sense that his plays and poems reflect and act upon social customs and ideas. Conversely, social customs and ideas infl uenced Shakespeare in his own day and continue to infl uence the great sum of what “Shakespeare” can mean to us today. The interplay between Shakespeare and culture is mutual and organic.

  This idea is perhaps now accepted wisdom about Shakespeare and culture. The current project adds greatly to
that perception by reading Shakespeare in the rich context of multiculturalism, including Chinese opera, colonialism, youth culture, and much more. Stage productions from Asia add immensely to our appreciation of what Shakespeare can mean by expanding the cultural horizon. I have had the great pleasure of attending conferences in Taiwan and elsewhere on this subject, with extraordinary productions, culminating in April 2011 at the meeting in Bellevue, Washington, of the Shakespeare Association of America, where Bond, a Yuju Bangzi Opera adaptation of The Merchant of Venice, was staged with a star cast and orchestral accompaniment.

  The essays in this present collection cover an admirable range of topics, and thereby illustrate how fruitfully complex the topic of cultural interchange can be. We are shown Shakespeare in the context of his own cultural environment: Protestantism and predestination, the “otherness” of racial difference, classical concepts of honor, Christian concepts of womanly silence and obedience, and still more. Other essays explore the language of interpretation, creating the potential for misinterpretation in male obsessions with womanly beauty and in discourses about sexuality. Shakespeare emerges in these essays as a profound and sensitive reader of cultural values and confl icts whose scripts are necessarily incomplete, prompting us to correct unceasingly our perceptions of what he has written. Of course we also need to reinterpret how Shakespeare’s plays can be presented on stage, and this is an area in which the present collection is particularly useful. I have already mentioned admiringly the Bond adaptation of The Merchant of Venice, which here serves as a vital text for Ching-Hsi Perng’s disquisition on how cross-cultural adaptation can transform the work while at the same time preserving and indeed enlarging the authenticity of the original. Two Korean productions of King Lear are analyzed in the present collection in such a way as to show how that play can be recast as tragicomedy. Noh and Kabuki theatres afford a similar opportunity to study how Shakespeare in production

  can make brilliant use of Japanese staging traditions to bring out aspects of the plays not easily seen in more traditional Western contexts. I remember particularly a Kabuki version of Macbeth at Wisdom Bridge in Chicago in 1983, in which the rice-paper screens of a traditional Japanese interior afforded a means for the audience to behold the murder of Duncan, backlighted from behind and silhouetted onto the translucent screens, whereupon Duncan, by now fatally wounded, plunged through those screens onto the main stage and was pursued into the audience by a bloodmaddened Macbeth. Throughout, the three weird sisters were onstage, manipulating the gestures of the play’s main characters: when a weird sister nodded or grimaced or made a dismissive hand gesture, Macbeth or Lady Macbeth would do the same. Determinism took visible shape on the Japanese stage. Akira Kurosawa’s Throne of Blood (1957) is another brilliant example: not a word of Shakespeare’s text remains, and yet the film is arguably the most perceptive interpretation of the play available to modern audiences.

  The essays in this present collection are thus importantly complementary to recent studies of world Shakespeares. One essay looks at the use of Shakespearean dress and vernacular translation in two Asian productions well before the advent of post-colonialism. Another essay shows how Othello was enlisted polemically into justifications of Japanese imperial power in the early twentieth century. Ambivalence toward

  Western cultural values in China emerges in a study of The Two Gentlemen of Verona in silent fi lm. On a global scale, one essay looks at Hamlet as a protagonist whose sensibility has penetrated to every corner of the globe. Shakespeare’s Sonnets are included too, as presented on fi lm and television, where they interact with pop culture and other aspects of our contemporary world. The wealth of cultural perspective on Shakespeare is everywhere apparent in this informative and highly readable collection of essays.

 

詳細資料

  • ISBN:9789860320749
  • 叢書系列:人文研究系列
  • 規格:平裝 / 353頁 / 23 x 15 cm / 普通級 / 單色印刷 / 初版
  • 出版地:台灣

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